The Farm Security Administration

The Farm Security Administration

article by Canbra Hodsdon (here)

The program lasted for nine years and produced some iconic images from photographers such as Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, and Arthur Rothstein.

"As a result of the New Deal, the United States formed The Farm Security Administration in an effort to combat the rise in rural poverty throughout the country, much as a result of the Dust Bowl. As part of their efforts, the FSA began a photography program that consisted of eleven photographers who were to document the hardships of the American people and the lives they were forced to live. Many of the images depicted sharecropping families constantly on the move living out of cars or tents with weather-worn skin and exhaustion in their eyes. The program lasted for nine years and produced some iconic images from photographers such as Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, and Arthur Rothstein."*

The word “iconic” has been used for these images more than once, and most people who pay attention to this sort of thing will have seen them before.

What struck me when i saw these photos again after having recently had a long(-ish) debate per blog over among other things food, agriculture, nutrition, poverty and (in-)justice, is the similarity of these images to contemporary images of destitution world wide.

* The Farm Security Administration, Canbra Hodsdon in Juxtapoz Magazine, Thursday, 08 May 2014 [http://www.juxtapoz.com/photography/the-farm-security-administration] last viewed 13 May 2014. 

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